Rooster’s Off to See the World- Activities

Rooster's off to see the world activitiesRooster’s Off to See the World by Eric Carle is a second-grade reading level book.  It is a wonderful read aloud to younger kids, especially when read with other Eric Carle favorites.  It tells the story of a rooster who wants to travel and asks several animals to come along with him.

(Common Core Standards appear in italics.  They correlate with specific standards in different grade levels.  These standards are used in almost every school in the country.  Click the Common Core tab above to learn more.)

  • Practice math- Do verbal or written story problems following along with the story.  1 rooster + 2 cats+ 2 frogs+ 4 turtles+ 5 fish = how many animals in all?  When the animals leave, write the subtraction problems.  (first grade- Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20)
  • Read with voice- This book makes a great read aloud.  Try out different voices for each of the animals.  Pay attention to words the author uses such as purred, snapped, or complained.  (second grade-Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.)
  • Alternatives to said– This activity goes along with reading with voice.  Make a list of all the words used instead of “said.”  Talk about why the author used these different words.  See if your child can use some of the new words in her writing.
  • Act it out- Use puppets or yourself to act out the story.  Maybe you could be the rooster and your child play the part of the other animals.
  • Write the sequel– The story ends with rooster dreaming about a trip around the world.  Where would he go?  What would he do?  Have your child make up the rest of the story and you can write it down.
  • Text to self connection- Ask your child to explain when he has felt like the characters in the story- excited for a trip, lonely, or homesick.  (first grade- Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly)

Number Memory Game

I loved playing Memory (or Concentration) when I was growing up.  If you are unfamiliar with the game, all of the cards are face down on a table and you take turns turning over a two at a time to get a match.  It’s a great game for improving (you guessed it) memory. We have a few different versions, but I thought it would be fun to make our number game to work on math skills.

DIY math Memory Game

  1. Use notecards or cut cardstock to make twenty cards.
  2. Have your child write the numbers 1-10 on ten cards.
  3. Have your child put stickers on the other ten cards.  One sticker on the first card, two on the next, and so on.
  4. Play Memory by matching up numerals with the correct number of stickers.

number Memory game

 

Common Core Standards

(kindergarten- Write numbers from 0-20)

(kindergarten- Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality)

(kindergarten- Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted.  The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted)

10 Ways to Play “I Spy”

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One of our favorite car games is “I Spy.”  The traditional game uses colors (at least the one I always played)…

  • Player 1 chooses a color of an object in sight of all players and says “I spy with my little eye something (insert color of object here).”
  • Other players take turns guessing objects that are the given color.
  • Some people allow players to ask yes/no questions  such as “Is it inside the car?  Is it smaller than my hand?  Is on the left side of the car?”
  • A player wins when she guesses the object correctly.  Then it is her turn to say “I spy….”

I Spy is a fun way to pass the time on a long car ride or in the waiting room of the doctor’s office.  As a bonus, kids are also learning!  What concepts could you work on using the game I Spy?

  1. colors- “I spy with my little eye something blue.”
  2. shapes– “I spy with my little eye something square.”
  3. numbers– “I spy with my little eye three of something.”  This would work best if you are in a room where the kids could walk around and easily count objects.
  4. letters- “I spy with my little eye the letter B.”  You could spy letters on billboards while you are driving, or letters on a page while you are reading.”
  5. words- “I spy with my little eye the word go.”  Again, this could work on billboards on the road or in books in a waiting room.
  6. spelling- “I spy with my little eye something that begins with the letter C.”  You could just give the first letter, spell out a whole word, or maybe even letter patterns inside the word like “ee.”
  7. phonics- “I spy with my little eye something that begins with the sound /s/.”  Same playing with letters, but this time use letter sounds.
  8. rhymes- “I spy with my little eye something that rhymes with bee.”
  9. adjectives- “I spy with my little eye something smooth.”  This is another game that would be best played in a room where kids could feel the different textures.
  10. measurement– “I spy with my little eye something about one inch tall.”  Be sure to review unit measurements before you play.  If you play this at your house, they could walk around and measure things with a ruler.

Writing in Shaving Cream

shaving cream writing

I am a little messophobic.  That’s a word, right?  I love to give my kids new experiences and it is fun to watch them get messy…but the clean-up.  The clean up.  Sometimes I don’t know if it is worth it.  Sigh.  Despite my messophobia, I got out the shaving cream one day.  I remember playing with shaving cream on the table when I was little and I loved it.  And of course, so did my girls.  Although Little Sis did not like to get it on her hands, so she used stick.  Maybe messophobia is genetic?

learning with shaving cream

Shaving cream might be the “fun factor” your kid needs to practice writing letters, numbers, or words.  Even toddlers can practice straight and curved lines that they will need to make letters.  Little Sis made lots of lines, while Big Sis did some writing.  She might need a little more practice on her numbers….

writing numbers in shaving cream

And the clean up was not as bad as I expected.  Luckily no one started throwing shaving cream, so it was just the table to clean up.  I could wipe most of it off the table with my hands and then wash it off in the sink.  Then a wet towel did the rest.  Shaving cream is officially approved for messophobes everywhere.

Here’s a round-up of 67 art and learning ideas for shaving cream from The Artful Parent.

Make a Number Activity

how many ways can you write a number

How many ways can you write a number?  I did this activity with my second grade students, but it would work for a wide range of ages.  Kindergartners can practice writing math facts, words, and pictures to show a number.   Older elementary kids can show off their math skills by doing multiplication, adding decimals, or fractions.  How do you play? Just pick a number and then take turns writing different ways to show the number.  All you need is a pen and paper, so it is easy to do while you are waiting at a restaurant or office.

See if you can write the number using…

  • words
  • pictures
  • Roman numerals
  • addition
  • subtraction
  • multiplication
  • division
  • fractions
  • decimals
  • money
  • time

Bowling Math

learning with bowling

Bowling is a fun indoor activity when it is too cold or hot outside.  We found a local bowling alley with a weekly special for preschoolers ($3 that includes one game, shoes, and a drink).  Though, even the smallest bowling balls are pretty heavy for little ones, so I recommend it for kids over 3.  Big Sis has a great time bowling, and it is educational, too!  Playing a sport is always a learning experience in my book.  But the bowling alley is also a wonderful place to practice math in the real world.  Old school bowling provided lots of math practice when you kept score with a pen and paper.  Yet, even with today’s bowling alley computers keeping score, you can still ask your kiddo some math questions.  Then just look up at the screen to check the answer!

teaching math with bowling

You can ask about…

  • Counting-  Count how many pins are still standing. (kindergarten- Count to tell the number of objects)
  • Make a ten- You started with 10 pins.  Now there are 6 pins standing.  How many did you knock down?  What number plus 6 makes 10?  (kindergarten- For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number)
  • Simple addition-  You knocked down 2 pins last turn and 3 pins this time.  How many did you get in all?
  • Two-digit plus one-digit addition–  Your score was 33, then you knocked 5 more down this turn.  What is your score now? (first grade- Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number…)
  • Subtraction– There were 10 pins and you knocked down 5.  What is 10-5?  (kindergarten- Add and subtract within 10)
  • Relationship between addition and subtraction-  There were ten pins and I see 2 still standing.  How many did you knock down?  You can think about it as “what number plus 2 equals 10?” Or you can think “10-2=?”  (first grade- Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem)

(Common Core Standards appear in italics.  They correlate with specific standards in different grade levels.  These standards are used in almost every school in the country.  Click the Common Core tab above to learn more.)

bowling math

And if you can’t go to a real bowling alley, maybe try some bowling on the computer with Starfall.com or bowl at home using this print out from whattheteacherwants.blogspot.com

Slush

The snow is melting!  The snow is melting!  Can you see my smile through the interwebs?  It’s big.  We went outside to play and celebrate.  And we got out hoes.  Yes.  I’ve never tried it before, but sidewalk scrapers and hoes easily pushed around the slushy snow on our driveway.  And if you have similar driveways/weather conditions…give it a try!

We made…

  • straight, curvy, and zig-zag lines and then walked on them
  • shapes
  • letters
  • numbers
  • words
  • and our favorite- “snow castles” or the if you want to be honest…piles of slush

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CANstruction- Learning with Cans

Our local food pantry, Harvesters, does a yearly competition where businesses build structures out of cans.  Then when the competition is over, all the cans are donated to Harvesters to feed those in need.  The designs are on display at the mall for about a month.

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IMG_4765We got inspired to make our own CANstruction at home!  Can you tell what we made?  (ha- unintentionally pun)

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Did you guess?  It was a giraffe, rainbow, and castle.  Constructing with cans was free, fun, and (bonus!) I had an organized pantry when we were all done.  It would be a great activity for the kids while you put away groceries.  And of course there is all sorts of learning that can be done with cans…

(Common Core Standards appear in italics.  They correlate with specific standards in different grade levels.  These standards are used in almost every school in the country.  Click the Common Core tab above to learn more.)

  • Colors- Talk about the different colors on the cans, then divide them into groups or make a rainbow.
  • Size- Compare sizes of cans.  Find all the cans that are the same size.  What happens when you stack a large can on a small one?
  • Counting– How many cans in all?  Count how many you can stack in a tower.
  • Addition and Subtraction– How many bean cans plus tuna cans do we have? (first grade- Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction)
  • Geometry- Talk about 2D vs 3D.  Use the word cylinder.  Point out the circles on top and bottom of a cylinder.   (kindergarten- Identify shapes as two-dimensional or three-dimensional)
  • Measurement–  Measure things around the room with cans.  How many cans long is the couch?  (first grade- Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end)
  • Classification- Sort the cans into groups based on color, size, or type of food.   (kindergarten- Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count)
  • Reading– Beginning readers might be able to read some of the labels using the picture as a clue.  If they know it is a can of corn, see if they can pick out the word “corn” on the can.
  • Letters- Try to make letters or even words out of the cans.
  • Creative building– And the most fun, building!

Egg Carton Ten Frame

A ten frame is a math tool to help kids visualize numbers and math facts.  It is usually drawn with squares on paper, but I thought it would be neat to make it 3D with an egg carton.  It is much more fun to drop items in a little hole than place them on a paper, right?  Are they even called holes?  Okay, I looked it up.  Wikipedia says they are called dimples.  That’s funny. 🙂

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How to make it:

  1. Cut off the lid of an egg carton and two of the dimples.  Yep, it is still making me smile   .
  2. Number them 1-10.  Usually ten frames aren’t numbered, so if this is for an older kid feel free to leave it blank.
  3. Find small objects to count.  For a reluctant little mathematician, use food.  Snacks will motivate anyone to do math!

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Now use it to teach:

(Common Core Standards appear in italics.  They correlate with specific standards in different grade levels.  These standards are used in almost every school in the country.  Click the Common Core tab above to learn more.)

  • one-to-one correspondence– Toddlers might be able to count to ten, but they might not understand what the numbers actually mean.  Touching objects as they count teaches one-to-one correspondence.  Show them how to pick up an object, say the number, and place it in the egg carton.  For more of a challenge, try to pick up objects using a spoon or chopsticks! (kindergarten-  When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object)
  • number recognition- If you number your egg carton, then they will be able to SEE the number as they SAY the number and drop in the item.
  • addition facts to ten– Using the egg carton, it will be easy to “see” the facts.  There are seven items in the egg carton and three empty spaces.  See if your child can write the addition fact 7+3=10.  (kindergarten- For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation)
  • relationship between addition and subtraction- The egg carton is a good visual to show how fact families work.  Place six objects in the carton and then write all the facts.  Another way to think about 10-6 is to find the number that makes 10 when added to 6.  Say “Six plus what equals ten?” and write 6+__=10.  (first grade- Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem)
  • place value-  Make some more egg carton ten frames to count larger numbers.  Each carton is a “ten.”   (first grade- Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones)
  • estimation-  Practice guessing how many objects and then checking by counting them in the egg carton.
  • even and odd– Explain that a number is even if it can be divided into two equal groups.  I talked about “even means it is fair” with my students.  Kids always have a concept of what is “fair and even” when dividing up goodies.  The egg carton is divided into two rows, so it is easy to see if a number is even (split equally and fairly) or odd.  This works even better if you are using food in your egg carton and actually split it up between two kids!   (second grade- Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members)

We used our egg carton to do some math with our morning snack (goldfish and blueberries).  Little Sis worked on counting and one-to-one correspondence and Big Sis practiced some addition problems.

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Learning with the Olympics

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We’re not a TV-watching family.  In fact, we don’t even have a TV.  We watch shows on our computer.  But for the past few days we have been glued to the Olympics.  With snow piled up on the ground outside, it’s nice to cuddle together under a blanket and watch some TV.  I remember watching when I was little and then practicing figure skating on the linoleum kitchen floor.  Fast forward to Big Sis jumping around the family room showing us her “snowboard moves.”  It makes my heart happy.

And while we are watching, we are learning about..

  • Sports– Being exposed to new sports is a great learning opportunity.  It gives kids background knowledge that will help their reading comprehension.  If they are reading a book where the characters are skiing, but they have no idea how to ski, it will be difficult to understand the book.
  • Sportsmanship–  The athletes reactions to falling down or low scores make good conversation starters about good (or bad) sportsmanship.
  • Geography– Just hearing the names of other countries is increasing kids’ knowledge about the world.  You can take it a step further and look up the countries on a map or globe as you are watching.  Talk about continents.  Compare sizes of countries.  The list goes on and on.
  • Flags– Play a game and point out our country’s flag each time you see it on the screen.  Identify other country’s flags and see if they can remember a few.  Or print out a sheet of flags and play a match game with the ones you see on TV.
  • Math–  There are numbers all over the place!  Younger kids can play “find the numbers” and call out 1-10 when they see it on bibs, scores, etc.  Older kids will be able to understand more about scores and times.  You can talk about place value with tenths of a second.  You can do math problems about how many more points someone needs to be in first.  Or make a table to show the metals from each country and add them up every day.

And then you can extend that learning.  You know, away from the TV.

  • Play a winter sport– Go ice skating.  Try out skiing.
  • Go to the library– Read books about the Olympics, a favorite sport, athlete, or country.
  • Make your own Olympics–  This is a family favorite.  Make up your own events and get the whole family involved.  The events can be board games, video games, obstacle courses, silly tricks, or even chores.
  • Get crafty–  There are lots of Olympics-related crafts on Pinterest. Get out your scissors and glue and get to it!